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Nsio explains: Dynamism by Nsio Nsio explains: Dynamism by Nsio
Fourth part (if excluding facial proportions) in my tutorial series. Probably my favorite thing about drawing.

Dynamism
Dynamism is what makes the drawings so lively. Even a drawing without any real action should be dynamic. Dynamism makes your drawings look more natural and interesting to look at. It can also make up for many mistakes and even make them look intentional and part of the drawing.

Line of action is the manifestation of dynamism. It's a sort of invisible line that (I believe) everyone can see subconsciously. I find that there are two types of line of actions: primary and secondary line of actions.

The primary line of action, like the name suggests, is the most important thing in your character. It gives the backbone to the whole pose. That's why it's really important that it's found very early in your sketches. Without this line, your poses will end up plain, boring and unjustified. The secondary line of action is more like a compositional guideline. It helps to justify the positioning of the sub-elements of the drawing, such as clothing, accessories, hair, limbs and shapes.

Regardless the role of the action line, it's main purpose is to add feel of flow in your drawings. This flow is then perceived as dynamic drawing. A good line of action is long, strong and as continuous as possible. These are prerequisites for illustrating dynamic action.
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:icondaniloolinad:
Daniloolinad Featured By Owner Jun 29, 2014
oh, that gonna help me a lot! thanks for the lesson, sensei :D i was not happy with some of my recent drawings :/ ya can see it in my gallery. i gonna practice...
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:iconitland-9-13:
itland-9-13 Featured By Owner Jun 29, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Really, this is totally going to be useful! Thank you very much!! ^^
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:iconearthgermblim:
EarthGermBlim Featured By Owner Jun 16, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Much love friend, excellent explanations. 
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:iconwasoriginal:
WasOriginal Featured By Owner Edited Jun 15, 2014  New member Hobbyist General Artist
this is sooo helpful thank you for making this :D
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:iconraybeer:
Raybeer Featured By Owner Jun 15, 2014
CIIIRNO!!!
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:iconrandomultiverse:
RandoMultiverse Featured By Owner Jun 1, 2014  New member Professional Digital Artist
omg so helpfull thnx
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:iconjohnsonpapa:
Johnsonpapa Featured By Owner May 27, 2014  Student Digital Artist
I absolutely love this! Thank you so very much for the tutorial~ ^-^
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:iconzunachina:
Zunachina Featured By Owner May 26, 2014  Student General Artist
I can't perceive lines of action at all! D:
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:iconzunachina:
Zunachina Featured By Owner May 24, 2014  Student General Artist
I dont get it. This is the first ive heard of it but still, I dont get it.
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:iconnsio:
Nsio Featured By Owner May 27, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
If it's your first time and you don't get it, it's not a surprise. Although I had started using the line of action very early, I realized its function many years later. It was all the practices, studies and analyses that made it clear to me.

Line of action is such conceptual level stuff that it's not easy to understand. There is no such thing as line of action in reality, yet it's the force that makes the drawings look dynamic and lively. You could say that the line of action is a simplified idea of the pose (or what ever it's representing). If the pose is stiff, it's simplified idea has too straight, short, wobbly or random line of action. If the pose is dynamic, it's simplified idea has impacting, forceful, flowing, long and continuous line of action. The sub-elements of the pose (head, neck, torso, arms, legs, hair, fingers, toes etc etc.) also have their own line of actions, which should work in harmony with the main idea. That said, if you want to draw a running pose for instance, you need to draw it so that the full body is engaged to the action, not only the legs that move the body.
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